After the Class – Concealed Carry Application Process

After the Class – Concealed Carry Application Process

So you’ve completed the required class for your Concealed Carry Permit (CCW) – the first steps to obtaining a license. Although the hard part is over, now it’s time for some paperwork and the waiting game, which can be just as challenging.

Below we’ll talk about common Concealed Carry Application Processes for states around SureShot Cincy, as well as a very common out-of-state option. We’ll cover what is required (as of publication) and where you can find the information you need.

Note: This is not meant to be a legal guide, and is only accurate to the date of publication or the last revision date.

Please be sure to read each step during the application process to ensure you file your paperwork correctly – Sureshot Cincy isn’t liable for any lost time or money should the steps change. If you do find a discrepancy between our guide here and the application process, please fill out the form here to let us know!

Clarifying Concealed Carry Application Types, Issuance, and Terms

Before we dive in, there are two sets of terms that we should discuss to clarify what you may read while applying. These rules vary by state, and can be checked on USA Carry’s website – a comprehensive and up-to-date resource for information.

Reciprocity

Reciprocity is a term that you’ll come to know well, love, and sometimes hate. By definition it is a mutual exchange of privileges – in this case, it specifically means that a state accepts your CCW license as valid. If you do not have reciprocity in a state, then you are not allowed to carry a concealed firearm. This isn’t taken lightly – don’t break the rules.

I’m going to link again to USA Carry, this time specifically their interactive reciprocity map which will allow you to select the states you have a permit in and then show all states that accept your license.

Resident vs. Non-Resident Concealed Carry Permits

There are two kinds of permits you can apply for – resident and non-resident permits.

Resident licenses, as the name implies, requires you to be living in that state with a physical home address. These permits will give you more reciprocity than the same state’s non-resident license. Depending on your state, resident licenses will be processed much faster (some within a few days, some within a few weeks).

Non-resident licenses are the opposite – it allows people residing in a different state to get a CCW permit for the state they’re applying for. These take much longer to process and may require extra steps.

While you typically get lower reciprocity as a non-resident, a non-resident permit for certain states may actually increase your reciprocity. An example would be if you live in a widely ignored state that only has small coverage but then applied for a Florida non-resident license – even as a non-resident, you get exceptional coverage.

As a demonstration, here are two reciprocity maps between a Resident License in Oregon vs. a Non-Resident License in Florida (as of December 31, 2016).

Oregon – Resident Florida – Non-Resident
Oregon Reciprocity Map - Resident License Florida Reciprocity Map - Non-Resident
Valid in 23 States Valid in 31 States
Of course, if you live in Oregon a Florida permit won’t let you carry at home, so this isn’t the best example out there. 🙂

Despite being a non-resident license, the Florida permit grants you right to carry in more states.

Shall Issue vs. May Issue

These are two sets of rules that the licensing office follows when reviewing your concealed carry application.

Shall Issue rules state that should you meet the criteria, pass the background checks, and properly fill out the application, you will receive your CCW.

May Issue rules grant the licensing office the ability to reject your permit, as there may be additional or specific requirements that you need to meet. You can also be rejected even if you meet all of the criteria – before applying to these states, it’s suggested you contact the licensing office to learn more.

The Application Process

Now that we’ve covered basic terms you’ll come across, here are some nearby states (and one non-resident state), their concealed carry application requirements, and useful links.

For reference, classes conducted by SureShot Cincy grant you a certificate of completion for a class conducted by a non-NRA employee, OPOTC, or military instructor that has been certified by a gun advocacy group (the National Rifle Association – NRA). An important distinction is that while we have a NRA licensed instructor, they are not NRA employees. However, we can still issue full NRA certification.

In general, the following requirements must be met:

  • Training & Educational Competency Certification
    • A certificate, document, or affidavit from a government agency or certified instructor that shows completion of minimum educational requirements
  • A completed concealed carry application form
  • A set of fingerprints required for a background check
  • A background check conducted by your local sheriff (will incur an additional fee depending on what kind of background check must be conducted)

In the application you will likely need additional information such as passport-sized photos, copies of the educational certificate, instructor contact information, etc.

Do not send the original certificate issued unless otherwise required – create copies in the case your application is denied or lost.

One important note is that you aren’t limited to just one license – to increase your coverage, you can apply for multiple concealed carry permits. These all must be filed separately.

The information below is valid as of January 1, 2017. Be sure to thoroughly read the attached information for your state before applying.

Ohio

Overview:

  • Ohio is a Shall Issue to residents only state
  • License fee (new and renewal) of $55, with an additional $24 required if an FBI record check is necessary
  • Licenses are valid for 5 years
  • Certificate of competency must be no more than six years old

Requirements:

  • 21 Years of Age or Older
  • Must be an Ohio resident for 45 days
  • Must be a resident of the issuing county (or an adjacent county) for 30 days
  • Completed Application
  • Color photograph taken within the last 30 days
  • Set of Fingerprints
  • Certification of Competency
  • Be able to purchase and own a firearm

Resources and Application:

Kentucky

Overview:

  • Kentucky is a Shall Issue to residents only state
  • License fee of $60 for new licenses, $40 for renewals
  • Licenses are valid for 5 years

Requirements:

  • 21 Years of Age or Older
  • Must be a Kentucky resident for 6 months
  • Completed Application
  • Color photograph taken within the last 30 days
  • Certification of Competency

Resources and Application:

Indiana

Overview:

  • Indiana is a Shall Issue to Residents and Non-Residents
  • License fee of $49.95 (four years) or lifetime ($134.95)
  • Licenses are valid for 4 years or lifetime

Requirements:

  • 18 Years of Age or Older
  • Completed Online Application
  • Set of Fingerprints
  • Certification of Competency
  • Have a “proper reason” to carry a handgun

Resources and Application:

Florida

While not adjacent to SureShot Cincy, Florida CCW licenses are an excellent option due to their wide reciprocity.

Overview:

  • Florida is a Shall Issue state to both Residents and Non-Residents
  • License fees for a new application cost $112, $102 for renewals
  • Licenses are valid for 7 years

Requirements:

  • 21 Years of Age or Older
  • Completed Application
  • Color photograph taken within the last 30 days
  • Set of Fingerprints
  • Certification of Competency

Resources and Application:


In Closing

Hopefully these resources and outlines can help you take the next step towards gaining your Concealed Carry Permit. Of course, laws change (frequently), so again, please be sure to read everything you’re filling out completely to check for accuracy – the above resources should be used as a guideline and not a definitive resource.

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